Wiebke Kapitzky

Wiebke Kapitzky
Fleckenblätter (2016) | a series of 5 drawings: 18,3 x 13,5 cm - 28,7 x 18,3 cm - 28,8 x 18,2 cm - 28,9 x 18,3 cm - 29 x 18,2 cm | ballpoint pen - acrylic - indian ink on paper - mounted on alu dibond with Japan paper
untitled (5137) (2013) | 50 x 40 cm | carbon paper on backlit paper
untitled (nach Hanne Darboven,2, Vgl. Elke Bippus u. Ortrud Westheider, Hanne Darboven. Kommentiertes Werkverzeichnis der Bücher, Köln: 2002, S.26-29 u. S.34) (2016) | 4 tekeningen: 29 x 18,3 cm - 29,1 x 18,2 cm - 29 x 18,5 cm - 28,8 x 18,2 cm | carbon paper - indian ink on paper
untitled (5138) (2013) | 50 x 26,7 cm | carbon paper on backlit paper
untitled (11638), untitled (11637), untitled (11636) (2016) | a set of 3 overpaintings: each 29,3 x 18,3 cm | acrylic - ballpoint pen - indian ink on paper - on stretcher
untitled (nach Hanne Darboven,1, Vgl. Elke Bippus u. Ortrud Westheider, Hanne Darboven. Kommentiertes Werkverzeichnis der Bücher, Köln: 2002, S.26-29 u. S.34) (2016) 7 drawings: 29 x 18,3 cm each | carbon paper - indian ink on paper papier
untitled (71111) (2011) | 98,6 x 62 cm | acrylic - pencil - felt-tip pen on paper
untitled (7125) (2012) | 71,5 x 101,7 cm | acrylic - pencil - carbon paper on paper
untitled (71510) (2015) | 91,5 x 55 cm | acrylic - indian ink - felt-tip pen - pen on backlit paper
Text: 

Wiebke Kapitzky's practice is characterised by chance observations, transmissions, connections and transformations. In various different ways, these are present in all her works and the result of a methodology based on repetition and experimentation. The process is not necessarily purposeful, but more a game of chance and coincidence. One could describe Kapitzky's approach as sequential, and her works as a type of stratification, or a combination of 'experiments' and 'reflections'. Her departure point is the structure and materiality of writing and its relationship to painting and drawing. Writing can range from the precise and diagrammatic to hastily scrawled 'to do' lists, or the repeated copying of words as an aide-memoire. Materiality, on the other hand, involves texture or simple ways of duplicating script, such as carbon paper. By overpainting, repeating and transferring the written source material, Kapitzky divests it of meaning and function. In her monochrome yet subtly nuanced works, only indeterminate and indecipherable traces of the original letters remain.