Mathias Casaer

Mathias Casaer
Linescape 1024, N°2 (2014) | 147 x 197 cm | oil on acrylic on canvas
Linescape 1024, N°14 (2014) | 147 x 197 cm | oil on acrylic on canvas
Linescape 512, N°3 (2013) | 147 x 197 cm | oil on acrylic on canvas
Linescape 512, N°3 (2013) | 147 x 197 cm | oil on acrylic on canvas
Linescape 1024, N°1 (2013) | 147 x 197 cm | oil on acrylic on canvas
Untitled (2015) | 110 x 140 x 40 cm | assemblage of paper - tabe - mixed
Still from Audioscape (2015) | computer rendered image
Biography: 

Mathias Casaer (°1980 , Louvain, Belgium) 
graduated as both a computer programmer and a visual artist at Sint Lucas in Ghent.
He was a software engineer for the architectural dept. of KULeuven University from 2002 to 2012, after which he settled in Ghent as a full-time artist. Having a background in both computer science and painting, he cross-breeds the two fields.
A recurring aspect in Casaer's work is the creation of computer simulations as a part of an intricate painting process. He invents methods to crystallize the heart of computing techniques into visual art spurred by an ambition to combine programming methods with a love for historical high-tech painting. This resulted in an oeuvre of drawings paintings, sculptures, digital projections, installations, assemblies.
His work is a conscious and recursive exercise to archive the immersive qualities of digital image creation into art and painting. As computer generated imagery is trying to immerse the viewer in an eclectic overdose of constructed data , he tries to desublimate this effect into paint and materials, enticing the viewer to look at the work and eyewalk a silent landscape, looking for details and form instead of significance.
The works themselves are purist, meticulously constructed, deterministic, binary, monochrome, dark, desolate; As legacy to its origins, these properties symbolize sentiments of strolling through virtual landscapes. They might refer to real landscapes, but are stripped of this significance. The oeuvre is a growing archive of such anonymous landscapes, already known to mankind, where the meaning is redefined to an empty search for epic farsights. 
A contrast with this vain odyssey to perfection is found in a playful stubbornness of practice and induced failure. Within his work he continuously challenges himself using various strategies that might offer an escape out of his self spun webs: tracing by hand, blending paint with inorganic materials, covering the painting with a black layer and start over again, incrementing complexity of compositions and mathematics, provoking chaos and diversion, scratching a dried up surface and such.
The juxtaposition of these two tenors is no coincidence; on one hand the artist follows a utopic desire to create perfect structures, using computing methods. On the other hand he embraces a melancholic acceptance of the failure to achieve this. The source of this duality is his continuous contemplation of the condition of a human individual in a world that is subject to a global process of informatisation.